The us government should take action on the increasing rate of homeless veterans

A great deal of government and charitable activity surrounding veterans does wonderful things for men and women who deserve the utmost support. Efforts to help veterans should begin by recognizing their abilities, rather than focusing exclusively on their disabilities, and should serve the ultimate aim of moving wounded soldiers from the category of "needing some help" to real self-sufficiency.

By looking at the experiences of today's veterans, and by examining the perverse incentives created by current policies and charitable practices, we can develop a support system more helpful to, and more worthy of, America's defenders.

As the authors explain, "because a return to work ultimately means sacrificing benefits," recipients of these disability benefits "face a financial incentive to remain non-employed.

Unfortunately, the VA does a poor job of assessing the capacity of wounded soldiers and maximizing their performance. But Soldier B has many advantages.

The Department of Defense offers a useful example of how this goal should be pursued. The fact that the VA has not undertaken a rigorous evaluation of the degree to which its policies discourage returning soldiers from working to their full capacity is itself revealing.

Similarly, the community may — consciously or not — begin to view the disabled person as an object of pity rather than as a citizen in full standing.

Take a look at 10 ways the VA is serving our vets and more. Veteran service organizations have been instrumental in helping VA establish these housing alternatives nationwide. To be sure, this danger is not limited to government entitlements.

The majority of veterans need no special help at all. When the measure is income — not only earnings, but also pensions and entitlements — veterans fare comparatively better still. This means targeting assistance to those veterans who are genuinely struggling with the transition back to civilian life, while avoiding giving more capable veterans reason to work below their potential or to not work at all.

But precisely because we know we owe our veterans a great debt, we tend not to question the particular ways in which our government goes about helping them.

To a certain extent, yes.

Homelessness: How Government Policy Makes It Worse

As apartment rents continue to rise and earnings for workers at the low end of the pay scale stagnate, more of our neighbors find themselves on the border of eviction. There are many reasons for this increase, but a major factor is surely the design of VA benefit policies, which distort incentives and encourage veterans to live off of government support instead of working to their full capability.

Thanks to improved trauma care, some servicemembers are collecting disability benefits for injuries that in past wars would have killed them. Even though an unemployed veteran is more financially vulnerable in the immediate term, his long-term interests may best be served by policies that encourage him to find employment as quickly as possible.

He still has nightmares from his first tour of duty, reliving the danger of fighting the insurgency in Iraq. His back hurts, he went through pancreatic cancer inand he has arthritis at 62 years old.

Capacity is the best an individual can be expected to do in a particular aspect of his life. First, they should always take incentives into account — even negative ones. Most tenants assisted by these legal services programs are able to remain in their homes and avoid the costly shelter system.

The VA's compensatory scheme thus relies on two abstractions: He was wounded in action twice and decorated for valor.

10 Facts You Didn't Know About Veteran Homelessness

One reason for this dramatic increase is a happy one: More than three decades ago, Coalition for the Homeless won a landmark legal victory that established the right to shelter for homeless people in New York City.

First, the VA no longer requires proof that the veteran actually experienced a specific traumatic incident because PTSD can arise from an accumulation of stress, particularly the persistent fear of enemy or terrorist activity that characterizes service in a combat zone.The U.S.

Interagency Council on Homelessness leads the national effort to prevent and end homelessness in America.

We drive action among our 19 federal member agencies and foster partnerships at every level of government and with the private sector. Efforts to help veterans should begin by recognizing their abilities, rather than focusing exclusively on their disabilities, and should serve the ultimate aim of moving wounded soldiers from the category of "needing some help" to real self-sufficiency.

Homeless Veterans Quick Facts.

Proven Solutions

While the number of homeless persons in the United States dropped by less than 3 percent between and according to the Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress, Veteran homelessness has shown a more significant decline.

Strategic Action Plan on Homelessness HHS is the United States government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and supporting the delivery of essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves.

and at leastpeople are homeless in the United States on any given night. Home Ending Homelessness Proven Solutions. Proven Solutions. Supportive Housing as a Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Homeless Shelter Capacity.

Facts on Homelessness

Take Action: Coalition for the Homeless won a landmark legal victory that established the right to shelter for homeless people in New York City. A study found that the rate of violent crimes against the homeless in the United States is increasing.

A Better Way to Help Veterans

[91] [92] In the United States in there were reported attacks on homeless people, an increase of 24 per cent on the previous year, according to the National Coalition for the Homeless.

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The us government should take action on the increasing rate of homeless veterans
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